Support Ripon College by giving through a Donor
Advised Fund (DAF)

A DAF is an exellent and tax-efficient way to give to charity. There are several big advantages to using a DAF as opposed to giving cash.

  • You get a tax deduction in hte year that you donate to the fund that you control.
  • You can give from the fund to charities of you choice years later.
  • You can donate euities that have appreciated and nobody owes capital gains tax.
  • Your donated money can remain invested in index funds.

IRA Rollover Update:

If you are 70½ or older, you may be interested in a way to lower the income and taxes from your IRA withdrawals. With an IRA charitable rollover, you can benefit yourself and help us continue our mission.

Learn More

Receive income for life and transform students' lives:

Are you looking for a secure source of fixed income for now or in the future and want to support Ripon? A Charitable Gift Annuity could be a solution.

Become a Partner in the Legacy at Ripon College

There are several easy ways to include Ripon College in your long-term plans such as designating Ripon College as a beneficiary of your:

  • Will
  • Living Trust
  • Life Insurance
  • Retirement Assets

Transform your Assets into Life Changing Gifts

Consider contributing:

  • Appreciated Stock
  • Retirement Accounts
  • Real Estate
  • Other Assets
Text Resize
Print
Email
Subsribe to RSS Feed

Sunday December 9, 2018

Savvy Living

Savvy Senior

How to Cope with Seasonal Affective Disorder

What can you tell me about seasonal affective disorder? I have always disliked wintertime, but since I retired and am home a lot more, the dark and cold winter months make me depressed and lethargic.

If you get depressed in the winter but feel better in spring and summer, you may indeed have seasonal affective disorder ("SAD"), a wintertime depression that affects roughly 6% of Americans.

In most cases, SAD is related to the loss of sunlight in the winter months. Reduced sunlight can upset natural sleep-wake cycles and other circadian rhythms that can affect the body. It can also cause a drop in the brain chemical serotonin, which affects mood, and can increase the levels of the hormone melatonin, which can make you feel more tired and lethargic.

If you think you may have SAD, the best way to diagnose it is to visit your doctor. Alternatively, you can take a SAD "self-diagnostic" test on the Center for Environmental Therapeutics website at CET.org/self-assessmen. In the meantime, here are several treatment options and remedies that may help.

Light therapy: The most effective treatment for SAD is sitting in front of a specialized light therapy box for 15 to 20 minutes a day. Light therapy mimics outdoor light to cause a change in the chemicals of the brain that are linked to mood. It is most effective when timed to fit a person's individual circadian rhythm, which varies widely from person to person depending on whether they are a night owl or a morning lark. You can calculate the proper time for doing light therapy by taking the circadian rhythm test atCET.org/self-assessment.

The best light therapy lamps provide 10,000 lux of illumination, many times stronger than typical indoor light, and have a diffuser screen that filters out ultraviolet rays and projects the light downward toward the eyes.

Cognitive behavioral therapy: Even though SAD is considered to be a biological problem, identifying and changing thought and behavior patterns can help alleviate symptoms too. To help you with this, choose a therapist who specializes in cognitive behavioral therapy and who has experience in treating SAD. To locate someone in your area, check with the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (FindCBT.org) or the Academy of Cognitive Therapy (AcademyofCT.org).

Antidepressants: Some people with SAD benefit from antidepressant treatment, especially if symptoms are severe. Some proven medications to ask your doctor about include the extended-release version of the antidepressant bupropion (Wellbutrin XL, Aplenzin), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (S.S.R.I.s), sertraline (also known as Zoloft) and fluoxetine (also known under the brand name Prozac).

Keep in mind, however, that it may take several weeks to notice full benefits from an antidepressant. In addition, you may have to try different medications before you find one that works well for you and has the fewest side effects.

Lifestyle remedies: Some other things you can do to help alleviate your SAD symptoms include making your environment sunnier and brighter. So, open up your blinds, sit closer to bright windows and get outside as much as you can. Even on cold or cloudy days, outdoor light can help, especially if you spend some time outside within two hours of getting up in the morning. Social activities and moderate exercise, such as walking, swimming, yoga and even tai chi, can also help alleviate SAD symptoms.

Savvy Living is written by Jim Miller, a regular contributor to the NBC Today Show and author of "The Savvy Living” book. Any links in this article are offered as a service and there is no endorsement of any product. These articles are offered as a helpful and informative service to our friends and may not always reflect this organization’s official position on some topics. Jim invites you to send your senior questions to: Savvy Living, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070.

Published December 7, 2018
Print
Email
Subsribe to RSS Feed

Previous Articles

How to Secure Veterans' Funeral and Burial Benefits

How to Find and Hire a Good Handyman or Contractor

Family Health History

When You Need Help Caring for a Parent

How to Capture Your Loved Ones' Story

scriptsknown
Physical Address: 300 W. Seward St. Ripon, WI
Mailing Address: PO Box 248 Ripon, WI 54971-0248
© 2018 Crescendo Interactive, Inc. PRIVACY STATEMENT
Email: adminfo@ripon.edu
Phone: 800-947-4766
Campus Map